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Hi folks

I'm going to be changing my van in the next couple of weeks [fingers crossed]. I've currently running a Ford 2.2Tdci lump, which has given brilliant reliability & economy 32mpg.

I'm thinking of moving to an 06 A-class that has a 2.8 fiat engine in it.
I'm not a big fan of Italian engineering as having alfa romeo a few years ago has put me off, also my mate bought an 08 plate rapido on the 2.3 fiat which after 1 hour of driving blew the turbo hose straight off! Anyway...

Is there anything I should be aware of, or I need to ask the question regarding problems with the 2.8 lump/chassis etc?

Is this scuttle & reversing malarkey a problem on the truck?
2006, 2.8TD, 11,000 miles on it.

Cheers

Wilse
 

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2.8 JTD

The JTD engine was a collaberative effort with GM. The engine may lack a little refinement but it is solid and powerful.

JTD in Fiat Parlance means Uni-Jet Turbo Diesel, as opposed to the later Multijet.

I had the turbo pipe blow off once, its not a drama just shoved it back on and tightened the jubilee a bit.
 

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2.8

Hi

My 06 Kontiki was on a 2.8 Fiat and it was ok. Never missed a beat, never went to the dealers for anything. Even towing a car it knoked up about 25 mpg. I then changed to a 3.0 MultiJet and when that van sold, I borrowed a 2.8 Burstner from a pal for a month. The 2.8 was certainly a low slower on response than the MultiJet, but I enjoyed my month and 1000 miles with it none the less.

What A class are you dabbling with? Are you fitting Gaslow :D 8O :p :roll:

Russell
 

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I have a 2.8 JTD and its cousin the Vauxhall 2.0 DTi.These are bullet proof engines.

The main difference really between JTD and the MultiJet I am aware if is the latter is the more modern higher pressure common rail diesel system - smoother and more power.

I had the turbo pipe blow off once, drove to the next junction, shoved it back on and nipped up the jubilee, its neither a drama nor will it cause damage for that short time.

Not like my mates Saab which needed 3 jubilees put on each end (under warranty....) to hold the pipe on.

Mind you I am only getting about 20mpg on my Burstner A645 (7 berth) averaging 65 to 70, which seems a bit low.
 

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2004 onwards 2.8jtd are the ones to go for. Before that year there were problems with the bolted on 5th gear. After 2004 a newer gearbox with integral 5th was fitted.
None of the judder issues with the latest 2.3 and 3.0 The water ingress in the engine bay on the newer ones only applies to the standard fiat van front and would not be an issue with an A class body.


Trevor
 

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Should've bought a Merc...bla bla bla. Got a timing chain...bla bla. It'll do quarter of a millon miles between oil changes... bla bla bla.

2.8 JTD IMO is a great prime mover for a MH. At 11K miles I'd personally be checking the service history. At low mileages oil changes are more critical than if the van's recieving regular use.

D.
 

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As earlier post says the 2.8JTD on a 2006 has the new gearbox, has no judder problems etc.

I moved from a 2.0tdci Transit, the things that are better on the Fiat are:

Quieter smoother engine
Nice to have the gearstick close to the wheel
Better screen washers
Shorter bonnet (easier to clean screen)
Better cab ventilation and heating
Comfier seats
More car like cab
Smoother to pull off in 1st
Better mirrors (all parts motorised)
3 water jets from each screen washer

Things that are worse are:

Pedals closer together
Wind noise from cab doors
No deadlocks
5th gear is slightly higher revving
 

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I have the 146 bhp version of the 2.8 JTD, absolutely delighted with it, no problems ever with it, now at 53,000 kms.
As mine is 2005 just had timing belt done, ouch!!, in a A class it can take up to 5 hours labour depending on accessibility. Average mpg about 25 but sometimes can go down to about 22 if 'pushing on' hard.
I reckon it's the best version of the engine, full torque arrives at only 1500 rpm and stays until 3200, it's just a pity they were never fitted to RHD, something to do with the steering column being in the way of the bigger turbo and inter-cooler I think.
 

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Jean-Luc said:
I have the 146 bhp version of the 2.8 JTD, absolutely delighted with it, no problems ever with it, now at 53,000 kms.
As mine is 2005 just had timing belt done, ouch!!, in a A class it can take up to 5 hours labour depending on accessibility. Average mpg about 25 but sometimes can go down to about 22 if 'pushing on' hard.
I reckon it's the best version of the engine, full torque arrives at only 1500 rpm and stays until 3200, it's just a pity they were never fitted to RHD, something to do with the steering column being in the way of the bigger turbo and inter-cooler I think.
A lot of owners remap the standard 2.8jtd to get over 150bhp IIRC
 

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Jezport said:
A lot of owners remap the standard 2.8jtd to get over 150bhp IIRC
But the Power engine is 146 bhp ex factory due to a larger variable geometry turbo and a larger intercooler and probably different mapping. I have often wondered what that set-up could be boosted to, but I have to say in standard trim the unit gives a fantastic drive and will pull its 3.85t load really happily from about 40mph and will tackle any motorway incline, in 5 gear.
 

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I've had three of these in self - builds. One was the older i.d.TD and two the later common rail engines.

Motor is fairly bombproof and very powerful and smooth though light years away from the latest 3 litre in terms of refinement in the same way the the common rail 2.8 was light years ahead of the direct injection i.d.TD 2.8. Very acceptable none the less and I would bet a lot more reliable in the longer term if the current crop of clutch failures etc. on the 3 litre are anything to go by...

Having said that I've never felt the drivetrain was up to much. The clutch is a little weak especially if you get the engine re-mapped and it doesn't need much provocation to get it to slip if you do a quick downshift to 4th and pile a lot of power through the 'box at highish revs. If this happens it will slip for a few hundred miles before bedding in again so it's not the end of the world but it's always given me the impression that it's on the edge in terms of being up to the job. It seems Fiat have managed to re-create this scenario with their latest 3 litre offering as well so maybe it's something the Italians just can't get right. In comparison a mercedes or Ford clutch is bullet-proof.

Similarly the gearbox has always felt a little light and that it needs to be looked after. Not too much trouble in a motorhome but I wouldn't want to make one tow a massive heavy trailer for years unless you wanted to be putting re-con 'boxes in fairly frequently.

The engine is easy to work on (at least in original van form) and everything except the alternator is easy to get at. It took me about an hour to do a cam-belt change, the starter motor comes off in 10 minutes and the radiators and intercoolers are pleasingly easy to get at.

The brakes are not up to much so be careful on mountain roads where you'll smoke them fairly easily. This is a trait that, again, Fiat seem to have repeated on the newer 3 litre vans as I've had the same with my Autotrail X2/50 when descending long mountain passes. Not the end of the world but you have to be careful.

The handbrake sticks terribly if left for a long time so best to park it up in gear and leave the handbrake off. Electrics are better than most Italian vehicles but can still have their moments especially the 'service' circuits for things like radios and lights. The immobiliser is legendary for immobilising the vehicle for owners who don't want it to be immobilised so make sure you get all the bits of plastic with the various codes on it so you can get it going again if it decides not to start or let you in one day. I think the newer ones were better for this but it's well worth getting a second key and paying for it to be programmed into the system properly and then keeping it somewhere safe so you have a backup. This costs about £200 all in.

As far as pipes etc. blowing off it does happen but as other posters have said you just push the pipe back on and do up the clip a bit or replace it with a better quality version. The engine runs fine with the turbo pipe blown off it just loses about half its power.

Good luck with it all.

Cheers, Mark
 

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I have had two, both excellent vans. I use mine a lot and do high mileage and never had a problem. I have less confidence in my new 3 litre due to clutch and flywheel problems although it does drive very nicely, Alan.
 
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