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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We're thinking of getting a breadmaker after reading all the good stuff about them on here.

Considering splashing out on the Panasonic. Can someone tell me what the difference is between the SD 254 at £80 and the SD 255 at £100?
(Apart from the price obviously!).

Any hints or tips on what to buy gratefully received.


Thanks
 

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The SD 255 has an automatic dispenser for
raisins etc. The cheaper one has a Beeper to tell you when to add - I think - I havent used this facilty.

I have the 254 and it is brilliant. Only problem is, I'm eating too much new bread! Very tempting when you get up to hot fresh bread.
 

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I would not bother paying so much money - ours came from Tesco, years ago, cost about £20 - replaced bread pan and paddle a few times but makes the same bread as a machine costing much much more!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Well I treated myself to a Panasonic SD255 a couple of days ago. Got it at Tesco - quite pleased as I got double points and an extra £5 off with a coupon.

Happy to report that the first 2 loaves I made in it came out more or less perfect! The machine is also really quiet and requires hardly any cleaning

Just need to find the best storage solution for keeping the bread as fresh as possible and a good knife (maybe electric?) for slicing it.

Question - do you slice it up all at once, or just cut off a slice or two as you need it?

Thanks
 

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Congratulations on joining the world of breadmaking.

The storage method we use is to wrap it in foil, once it has cooled. Home made bread won't last as long as a lot of shop bought bread, presumably because that contains preservatives, but ours usually gets eaten before it goes stale.

I can't think of a good reason for cutting it all at once, but if that would be convenient for you you could try it and see if it works. I imagine there's a risk of it going stale quicker but it probably depends how well it is wrapped.

My sister-in-law often makes hers into batches of rolls and freezes them. I haven't done that but if I have got the end of a loaf that's gone stale I sometimes freeze it for making breadcrumbs, or whizz it into breadcrumbs and then freeze.

Happy breadmaking


Chris
 

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Hezbez said:
Just need to find the best storage solution for keeping the bread as fresh as possible and a good knife (maybe electric?) for slicing it.

Question - do you slice it up all at once, or just cut off a slice or two as you need it?

Thanks
I am old enough to remember the days *before* sliced bread so I was initially a bit surprised to see a question about how to slice bread :D

I slice it a I need it: one thin one for her and a thick one for me usually: I don't actually 'store' it because it doesn't last that long. Sometimes the 'other end' crust knob has gone stale before we get to it ( and I *do* like the idea of crumbing it: ours usually goes to the birds. )

I just keep the bread in a cupboard: I alwasy stand it 'cut end' down to prevent it drying out.

Before making my own I used to buy several uncut 'bakery' loaves from supermarket and freeze them. I put them in a plastic bag first. Usually kept well.

I would not advise using an electric knife: likely to end up with lots of crumbs imho. Get a good breadknife.

Harvey
 

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Use of 'stale' bread

Stale bread from the rump of the loaf is just right for bread and butter pudding.

Or would that be something few can remember too ?

A whole stale loaf makes into a bigger pudding.
 

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Re: Use of 'stale' bread

LeoK said:
Stale bread from the rump of the loaf is just right for bread and butter pudding.

Or would that be something few can remember too ?

A whole stale loaf makes into a bigger pudding.
What I remember is Bread Pudding made by my Nan, Mum and Aunt. It's totally different from Bread and Butter Pudding, which I only came across later in life.

Bread Pudding is spicy, fruity, soft in the middle and crunchy on top. It's made by breaking up the bread and soaking in milk, with the other ingredients It was usually eaten like cake, in your hand, not in a bowl with custard and a spoon. Does anyone remember this kind of Bread Pudding? More importantly does anyone have a recipe? I've tried to make it from memory and have made reasonable efforts but I wouldn't mind a definitive version.

When we visit my sons family and go into Weymouth I've been able to buy Bread Pudding in a bakers there. I've not seen it on sale anywhere else.

Chris
 

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Bread Pudding

Hi Chris

There's not really a recipe for bread pudding. Just put in what you've got really. I used to make it quite regularly when the kids were still at home but haven't made it for year now.

You've got the basic recipe already - break soaked in milk and squeezed out, add mixed spice, mixed fruit and sugar (and a bit of coffee powder to colour it - or you can use a bit of gravy browning!). Mix it all together and then put in a tin and bake in centre of oven for about an hour or so at 180.

You check if it's ready the same way as a cake - stick a skewer or sharp knife in and if it comes out clean it's ready.

It's lovely hot but does tend to repeat so probably better to let it cool down.

Denise
 

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Re: Bread Pudding

joedenise said:
Hi Chris

There's not really a recipe for bread pudding. Just put in what you've got really. I used to make it quite regularly when the kids were still at home but haven't made it for year now.

You've got the basic recipe already - break soaked in milk and squeezed out, add mixed spice, mixed fruit and sugar (and a bit of coffee powder to colour it - or you can use a bit of gravy browning!). Mix it all together and then put in a tin and bake in centre of oven for about an hour or so at 180.

You check if it's ready the same way as a cake - stick a skewer or sharp knife in and if it comes out clean it's ready.

It's lovely hot but does tend to repeat so probably better to let it cool down.

Denise
Thanks Denise, that's pretty much what I've done, minus the coffee or browning (but then the bread is usually wholemeal). I just wasn't sure if an egg should go in?

Chris
 

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Hezbez
Welcome to the wonderful world of breadmaking and in particular to the Panasonic fan club :lol:

I only joined myself in March this year and I haven't bought a shop loaf since. I found it best to stick to the recipes EXACTLY as per the manual for the first few weeks until I got to know how they turn out etc. Then the fun begins and you get to be brave and experiment. At the weekend I made a garlic, herb and walnut loaf to go with the bar b que food and the family raved about it. It's lovely to bathe in all the glory when really it's the beautiful gadget that is doing all the hard work for you :wink:

I got a lot of help on here and asked lots of questions so feel free to ask away....it really helped me.

Chris

With apologies to Hezbez for hijacking the thread :roll:
For my Bread Pudding I stick mostly to the recipe in the old (1968) copy of the Good Housekeeping Book I have and there is no mention of coffee or gravy powder in there and I have to say it wouldn't be my choice (no offence meant).

If you use wholemeal bread you wont need to worry about the colour anyway.

Here is the recipe...it's dead easy and works every time and you can add anything you like really...glace cherries are good and nuts.

Ingredients:
8 oz bread - preferably stale
½ pt milk to soak bread
6 oz mixed fruit of choice (sultanas, raisens, glace cherries etc)
2 oz shredded suet
2 oz Demerara sugar (helps with colour as well)
1 - 2 tablespoons mixed spice (I use more as I love the spicy flavour)
1 egg beaten
Nutmeg (optional)
Heat oven to 350F or gas mak 4
Grease a 1½ pint pie dish.
Remove any hard crusts from bread and break the crumb into small pieces.
Pour the ½milk over it and leave to soak for ½ hour - then beat out the lumps.
Add the dried fuit, the suet, sugar and spice and mix well.
Add the egg with a little extra milk if required to make the mixture of a dropping consistency.
Pour into the pie dish, grate a little nutmeg on top if liked and bake in the centre of the oven for 1½ - 2 hours. Dredge with sugar before serving.

I believe this also used to be called Dockers Wedding Cake as some old London friends of mine told me. I always use shredded suet but have seen other recipes that use margerine. Cant say what that turns out like tho.

Good luck.....the smell from the oven is unbelievably good :)
Maura
 

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mauramac said:
I believe this also used to be called Dockers Wedding Cake as some old London friends of mine told me. I always use shredded suet but have seen other recipes that use margerine. Cant say what that turns out like tho.

Good luck.....the smell from the oven is unbelievably good :)
Maura
Thanks Maura, I'll experiment a bit with your recipe. When I tried it before I don't think I put any fat in so I might try it with some margarine. I won't use suet in case I want to offer some to my veggie friends (quite apart from fears for my cholesterol levels!).

I'm fascinated by the name Dockers Wedding Cake as my Dad was a docker in Tooley Street. Do you think this is a southern 'dish'. None of my Yorkshire friends seem to have heard of it?

Chris
 

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ChrisandJohn said:
Thanks Maura, I'll experiment a bit with your recipe. When I tried it before I don't think I put any fat in so I might try it with some margarine. I won't use suet in case I want to offer some to my veggie friends (quite apart from fears for my cholesterol levels!).

I'm fascinated by the name Dockers Wedding Cake as my Dad was a docker in Tooley Street. Do you think this is a southern 'dish'. None of my Yorkshire friends seem to have heard of it?
Chris
Chris - don't worry about the cholesterol levels - I use the Atora Light (30% less fat) Shredded vegetable suet. It's made from vegetable oils and wheat flour with pectin as the stabiliser. Using suet is the traditional way to make Bread Pud - so I'm told and this veggy one works well.

Dockers Wedding Cake - because they were often hard up and this was a cheaper version (again this is only what I've heard from my friends Nan who is Bermondsey born & bred).

Of course you can add pretty much anything you like - including alcohol to this recipe but if you are just after the basic traditional bread pudding then the above recipe is pretty much spot on.

We love it hot or cold but it is scrummy with hot custard.

Now I am making my own bread I rarely get any leftover to make bread pud :cry:
 
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