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Ive noticed when leaving the van for sometime (2 or 3 weeks) and not using it, the brake discs start to rust a little. I only use the van occationaly as it drinks a fair amount of fuel (1.9ltr, Petrol ( :) ) VW Autosleeper T4 it does 20 to 25 MPG ) .I was wondering if there was anyway to stop the rust when I intend to not use it for a while.

I know I could use a breathable cover, but i worry about what the neghbours will say to a great big green 15ft by 8.6ft glorified tent in the carpark, cause thats what the motorhome would look like with a cover on it!


If anyone has any ideas I would be very happy to hear from you.
Thanks all for a great forum
 

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Hi Andrew,
Our very first MH was on a VW and after 12 months use and shortly after a service we found it was juddering when applying the brakes. Took it back to the VW agent who said the disc brakes had to be replaced as they were rusty and pitted etc and yet I used to take the MH out at least very 1-2 week-ends! Needless to say I wasn't very happy. He also stated it was lack of use. I haven't had the problem with Fiat brakes, apart from their recall that is.
 

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Andrew,

I'd say leave the handbrake off if not using the van for more than a week, and make sure you use the brakes heavily for one or two applications soon thereafter to remove the corrosion on the discs.

Dave
 

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1) steel rusts
2) the operation of the brakes rubs off the rust & makes the discs nice & shiny
3) if you don't use the van the steel on the brake discs or drums will get a rust covering; especially if you leave it after washing & hosing down or after heavy rain.

I think that leaving the handbrake off is only effective with drum brakes? On discs there is only contact with the disc where the caliper is. Best to have a run to get the surfaces worn down - especially for the engine & moving components too.
 

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I'm told the corrosion can have an effect on the pad, disc or drum, which promotes brake squeal and glazed pads. Even though when the brake is off there is still slight contact, brake on makes this situation worse, apparently. Or that's the yarn I've been spun, anyway :)

Dave
 

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Hand Brake

Definitely better to leave the handbrake off if leaving parked up for a while - especially in the winter months.
Just leave the van in gear - but remember to turn the engine over now and again to keep the cylinder bores lubed to offset corrosion.
Alternate between hand brake on / leave in gear to avoid problems-if you have to leave the van for months on end.
 

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If your leaving the van long periods you will get these problems, better as suggested to try and run the van frequently.

As for the corrosion affecting the disc or pads, it depends on the amount of corrosion, by what Andrew has said 2-week intervals, I wouldn't think that is an issue.

It's not doing your vehicle any good sat idle, you should really try and use it more, and not always possible I know.

MHS...Rob :D
 

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Treat the following subject with CAUTION...

I suffered brake-squeal on my Mercedes saloon, and was advised that a Copaslip product could effect a cure. Apparently it's routinely used to spray on motorcycle brake discs. I was told that, not only does it stop one particular cause of squeal, but it also prevents discs from rusting. The lubricant is quickly removed when the wheel turns and brakes applied.

I was incredulous! How on earth can you spray (albeit lightly) a lubricant on a brake disc, yet not contaminate the pads, and expect the brakes to work? But apparently you can, according to this mechanic. I chose to have the discs and pads changed under warranty (after much complaining) so this 'cure' was never tested by me.

I've just e-mailed Molyslip, the makers of Copaslip, to see whether the above is true, and whether such an application could prevent discs from rusting.

I'll let you know their reply.

I also found this in reference to WD40:
"Protects cast iron brake rotors when storing vehicle"
but I DON'T recommend any of this until I've heard from the company
 

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Appling any sort of fluid to the braking surface of disc brakes and drums (subject to access) is a NO NO.

Molyslip or copper slip is used in brake maintenance BUT NOT ON THE BRAKING SURFACES, Its used in other parts, so I feel a lot has been lost in translation. The brake pads/shoes will absorb any fluid, especially oil.

The original poster mentioned covering the whole vehicle. From what is mentioned I expect the vehicle is kept in an exposed position, hence the rapid rusting. Rather than covering the whole vehicle, why not cover just the disc braked wheels (you won't get the same sort of rapid rusting on drum brakes due to their design being enclosed). Now what you use may also have a baring on its effectiveness, personally, but I'm not always correct, I would wrap the wheel in a cloth (as a final barrier to absorb any moisture), not just the front, but around the back as wind will blow under the vehicle, then cover that with a tarp of some sort.
 

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Copperslip,copper grease or what other brand name you come across is NOT TO BE USED ON BRAKE DISCS. I use it on the REAR of my brake PADS(a thin smear kept away from the actual brake pad material) on the motorcycle and as a anti sieze for nuts and bolt etc, very effective it is too;0) The only way to stop rust on steel discs is to keep your discs dry or use the vehicle more, another alternative is stainless steel discs.



Crackpot.
 

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:D Copperslip (by any other name) should only be used on the moving parts of the brake mechanism. NEVER on the brake surfaces. With regards to leaving the Park Brake off? If you have an automatic and are on a slope? Leaving the hand brake (Park brake) is a NO NO. Putting the automatic into PARK without applying the Park Brake (on a hill or slope) will possibly (most probably) cause an Hydraulic lock to the gearbox. :cry:
 

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hi guys

use copperslip on the rear ( metal side ) of the pads sparingly to stop the squealing , it buffers the rapid vibration and friction from being transmitted which causes the squeal you hear,
cheers
kenny+stella
 

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Here's the reply from Molyslip (makers of Copaslip):-

"...there are no definitive answers. The vast majority of manufacturers suggest that a copper grease can be applied to the back of the pad, however there is a minority who advocate that no grease be added in order to avoid contamination of the brake surface which can result from over packing. We sell Copaslip indirectly to a number of brake manufacturers but by no means all.
Furthermore, whereas I have not heard of Copaslip being applied to the disc I do know that in some cases it has been applied in small amounts to the face of the pads - yes the face. Although we at Molyslip do not recommend this. The car is then driven forward and the brakes applied to burn of the oil content of Copaslip. The solids in Copaslip copper etc. are left filling the microscopic roughness of the pads thus ensuring smoother braking.
I'm sorry we can not be more specific, but at the end of the day it comes down to personal experience and choice."


So, my mechanic informant wasn't wrong, even though it flies in the face of everything that I've ever known about keeping brake discs/pads uncontaminated. I think the operative words are "to burn off the oil content" - the same would apply to any very light oil, such as WD40, applied in minute quantities. The enormous heat from disc friction will evaporate it. Good sense should prevail - do NOT apply Copaslip to discs, and if you choose to use WD40, ensure it's the very lightest of spray, and even then, not directly on the pads. If I was to do this, I'd then subsequently spray the discs with 'brake cleaner' to remove most of the WD40, then wipe with kraft paper before driving the vehicle for the first time.

The rule of thumb remains - do not put lubricant on the discs, but if you do, ensure that you know what you're doing... on your head be it!
 
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