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Try This
Set all of your nightime security
Get the family into bed
Set off your alarm clock or fire alarm and try to get everyone out into the fresh air with one lungful of air.

Still want to lock, chain and bolt everything?
 

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Hi traveller

have you ever had any alarming incidents with your van, ie fires or security problems

if so i stand corrected

if not .........then believe me ..........LOCKS CHAINS AND BOLTS ALARMS AND MORE IF POSSIBLE :

Paul
 

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Fire alarms

I've not long retired after a total of over 37 years in the Fire Service [inc RAF] and during that time I think I've seen most types of fires - including two elephants on fire [true] - as to fires in motorhomes or caravans these are thankfully fairly rare - although because of their lightweight construction of wood & aluminum not much has been left by the time the fire engine arrived - except the burned out chassis & blobs of rubber tyres, having said that my opinion is that motorhomes & caravans are no more dangerous or prone to fires than your house or car - simple rules & precautions are your best defence; fit a fire alarm & replace the battery twice a year - I know that the battery will last 12 months but for the price of a new battery I've got peace of mind], carry an extinguisher [replace if the gauge shows any loss of pressure], have the gas system & electrics checked out by an expert & most importantly - ensure no smoking materials are left inside unattended[ - I smoke a pipe but only outside [even if its wet & windy] & have a tin with a close fitting lid for all the bits], I hate to think of how many fires I've attended caused by cigarette ends or matches smoldering,as long as you take these any anyother sensible recautions you should be able to sleep safe & sound all night.
sweet dreams :sleepy2:
 

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got my new van friday third june and the only fault found so far was the battery in the fire alarm was not connected, so if you have recently collected a new van don't assume that the alarm is ok CHECK it.
 

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Hi there you all,

Lots of good advice given regarding this subject of Fire Alarms, but one aspect continues to be forgotten and that is "Fire Spread". There must be a minimum distance between vehicles of a least 6m (20 feet). All too often when I attend rallies, the vehicles are places far too close to each other. If anyone is unsure of this fact, please contact your local fire station and they will give you all the information regarding spacing you require. They are there to help. (Retired Fire Safety Officer after 25 years service.)


"Take care out there"
 

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:) Hello Traveller,
Having recently retired from the Fire Service, I am in a position to give you the best possible advice. Most domestic smoke detectors are of the ionisation type and will pick up tiny particles of smoke that none of us could see or smell. In other words, an extremely good early warning alarm. So, you and your family would be abruptly awoken by the sounding of the alarm, and still be able to exit the MH without the need to hold your breath. Your wee practise run was a bit unfair to the extremely efficient smoke detector. But, it's only as good as the battery that is in it. :( Hope this helps.
TTFN Jock. :)
 

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Fair enough Jock but the context of this first letter was in answer to the subject of multiple security devices inside the van. We have all read about the use of flammable upholstery material in imported vans as well. I once saw a fire brigade demo of a caravan fire and it has scared me since as to how fast it all went up in flames.

If our smoke alarm went off in the night I would not want to have to get up in a panic, fumble with the light switch ( lights possibly not functioning?) and then find the keys and knobs etc to operate various internal security devices in order to get us out. I would not want to think that there might be toxic fumes as well as flames.

Incidentally we change all our smoke alarm batteries -home and van- on May 1st every year -a useful mnemonic as it is May Day.

G.
 

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Hi Grizzly,
I appreciate your concerns, however, if you are careful with igniteables and appliances, and have a fire plan in the event of a fire, (just as you would do for your home), you dramatically decrease the event of fire and the time taken to exit. For us, the security would be the prime concern, knowing that our trusty smoke detector will look after the other worrying aspect of fire. Ask the kids about a fire plan. They are all getting it in the form of community education in schools nowadays. I hope you and your family can feel safe and secure at the same time.
TTFN, Jock. :)
 

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In the event of a fire the aim is to GET OUT AND STAY OUT
dont worry about all the other alarms going off
They will only help to arouse the neighbours

We keep a small torch by the bed so if the electrics go off we still have a light

Change the alarm batteries annualy but you are recommended to test the alarm at weekly intervals in between
 

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jdotagain said:
I found there best way to check out info on a fire alarm was at fireandsmokealarms.net . They have all the info you would need to make your fire alarm purchase a good one!
Looks more like an American Ebay advertising ploy.

As a former Firefighter and Community Safety Advisor, I'd rather direct folks to this More Informative Link :roll:

Jock.
 

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Hi allLike the other posters I too have more than a little experience of fire fighting and fire prevention.

Although a frequent and routine test of the alarm system is highly recommended, in fact I would be so bold as to say mandatory.

On my ship (of which I happen to be the chief engineer) a legally required test of the fire detection system is carried out on a weekly rotational basis, individual detector heads are tested be they of heat or smoke type, using either canisters or test "smoke" or a heat gun.

However pressing the test button on our domestic alarms merely proves to me that the electronic side of the system is functioning correctly.As previously stated , domestic fire alarms are of the ionisation type requiring a minute amount of particlular matter for activation.

Why not set the alarm off correctly by directing smoke at it ! surely the smell of a bit of overdone toast or bacon sarnie for a short while is worth the peace of mind that knowing your alarm works correctly can only  give.

Incidentally we too have an evacuation plan for both home and van, tried and tested.

Ok guys rant over ! but this is a subject about which I have strong feelings

regards

The Yeti
 

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Can one of the firefighter technical bods please confirm a niggling doubt.

Does repeated exposure to smoke (say by regular testing) eventually reduce the effectiveness of ionising smoke detectors?

I ask this because we had a little incident in the kitchen at home a few weeks ago.

Her indoors accidentally left a boiled egg aboiling on the electric cooker when she became her outdoors for a couple of hours.

When she returned the three smoke detectors were shouting their heads off and there was exploded boiled egg literally all over every inch of the kitchen.

The pan had boiled dry and had luckily just jumped to a different part of the hob away from the still glowing ring.

I have checked/replaced the detector batteries as necessary.

However, although the detectors test OK with their buttons they seem not to be quite as sensitive to the frequent making of toast activation that we previously enjoyed.

Just wondering if the prolonged exposure has reduced their detection efficiency.

Any knowledgeable comments?
 

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pippin said:
Can one of the firefighter technical bods please confirm a niggling doubt.

Does repeated exposure to smoke (say by regular testing) eventually reduce the effectiveness of ionising smoke detectors?

I ask this because we had a little incident in the kitchen at home a few weeks ago.

Her indoors accidentally left a boiled egg aboiling on the electric cooker when she became her outdoors for a couple of hours.

When she returned the three smoke detectors were shouting their heads off and there was exploded boiled egg literally all over every inch of the kitchen.

The pan had boiled dry and had luckily just jumped to a different part of the hob away from the still glowing ring.

I have checked/replaced the detector batteries as necessary.

However, although the detectors test OK with their buttons they seem not to be quite as sensitive to the frequent making of toast activation that we previously enjoyed.

Just wondering if the prolonged exposure has reduced their detection efficiency.

Any knowledgeable comments?
Hi Pippin,

Sorry for the delay in replying.

My advice to you, (and I've just had it confirmed), is that as long as the detectors pass the push button test..........and the smoke test, then there shouldn't be any reason to change them unnecessarily. Light a match whilst near the detectors, blow it out and offer the stream of smoke up to the detector head without touching it. If the detector sounds off, it is okay. At this stage, I am not in a position to offer a more technical answer regarding a reduction in efficiency due to prolonged exposure.

What I will say, is that if there is any doubt in your own mind, I would replace with 3 x new 10 year smoke detectors. If you need a more official reply to your question, contact your local Community Fire Safety Dept for advice.
If you've not had a "Home Visit", they will come out to the house at a time that suits you, talk about the risks in the home, etc, and may even fit another detector, if they feel that you are not sufficiently covered by your current arrangements. If you need any more info, give me a shout via a PM.

BTW, when vacuum cleaning, offer the nozzle brush up to the detector heads regularly to clear the vents of dust. It is a good idea to open the head occasionally to vacuum the dust build up inside too. Dust can sometimes affect the efficiency of the detectors.

HTH,

Jock.
 

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I'm ready for some flack on this but.......here goes.

I think standard smoke detectors are too sensitive for use in Kitchens. Normal cooking sets them off. Would it not be possible to have a de-sensitised smoke alarm suitable for kitchens that would only go off when there is a fire ?

Following this same train of thought - the same is true for my motorhome.
Every time I cook anything -the alarm goes off. Even when I stick it in the cuttlery draw !
So I have little alternative but to take the battery out.....which I then forget to put back in.

Perhaps you can get alarms with a 2 position sensitivity switch i.e. daytime/nightime ???

I know there are none-ionisation detectors. Are these suitable ?

Anyone got any suggestions.
 

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AberdeenAngus said:
I'm ready for some flack on this but.......here goes.

I think standard smoke detectors are too sensitive for use in Kitchens. Normal cooking sets them off. Would it not be possible to have a de-sensitised smoke alarm suitable for kitchens that would only go off when there is a fire ?

Following this same train of thought - the same is true for my motorhome.
Every time I cook anything -the alarm goes off. Even when I stick it in the cuttlery draw !
So I have little alternative but to take the battery out.....which I then forget to put back in.

Perhaps you can get alarms with a 2 position sensitivity switch i.e. daytime/nightime ???

I know there are none-ionisation detectors. Are these suitable ?

Anyone got any suggestions.
Hi Angus,

The easiest option is not to fit it in the kitchen. I certainly don't advocate fitting a domestic smoke detector in the kitchen area, nor in the living room/lounge where there is an open fire in use.
Where possible, the detector should be ceiling mounted within a short distance of the entry/exit door to the kitchen, ie in the hall way.

You can buy detectors with a "hush" facility, which allows you to isolate it whilst cooking the toast for example, and after so many minutes, it resets it's self. Ideal for the MH. One of the reasons I wouldn't advise the fitting of a battery operated detector, is because the weak link in it's ability to operate efficiently, is the silly so and so that removes the battery. :wink:

I and my former colleagues throughout Britain have been to a number of fires in domestic properties..................where the batteries to the smoke detectors have been removed, sadly, but often resulting in fatalities.

HTH,

Jock.
 
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