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Yes he was a useful member, I often go to his website.
 
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I have noted that when people replace their existing batteries with LiFePo4 they usually opt for one battery, maybe because they are quite expensive.

I wonder whether that is wise because of the risk of one cell failing in that battery leaving one with no battery power.

Or are LiFePo4 less prone to cell failure?

Informed comments, please.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have been researching them and see no adverse comments relating to cell failure, but of course as time passes as with all batteries some cells will break down before the others.

It does seem that LiFePo4 are less likely to catch fire and I'd hazard a guess that they don't emit gas so won't explode. Having had a lead acid go off like a bomb below the floor under my bed a few years ago I'd count that a big plus.

If you haven't seen a good battery explosion you may not understand. Check it out on youtube.
 

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Very informative.

Good to see Clive's name again. Long time since.
Thanks Alan that's a real game changer. I was aware of the new lithium technology but didn't realise that some of them can be regularly discharged down to 5% without causing deterioration. That compared to the 50% discharge threshold for the lead acid ones increases your amount of available power enormously.

Trouble is the equipment on my van shuts off the leisure batteries when their charge falls below 50%. I wonder if it can be changed.
 
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Thanks Alan that's a real game changer. I was aware of the new lithium technology but didn't realise that some of them can be regularly discharged down to 5% without causing deterioration. That compared to the 50% discharge threshold for the lead acid ones increases your amount of available power enormously.

Trouble is the equipment on my van shuts off the leisure batteries when their charge falls below 50%. I wonder if it can be changed.
I don't know if you're on the Wild camping forum but there are two Moho electric chaps on there, Wildebus and admin.
 
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Thanks Alan that's a real game changer. I was aware of the new lithium technology but didn't realise that some of them can be regularly discharged down to 5% without causing deterioration. That compared to the 50% discharge threshold for the lead acid ones increases your amount of available power enormously.

Trouble is the equipment on my van shuts off the leisure batteries when their charge falls below 50%. I wonder if it can be changed.
Dick, I thought that the shut off was voltage dependant, with lithium the voltage remains at or near 12.7 until almost depleted then drops like a stone and if you continue to use the battery management system shuts it off to protect it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
From what I read it seems that modern chargers do have an option that would suit a LiFePo4 battery?

As I recall it was the higher terminal voltage option?
 

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So you can discharge to 5% but not good practise to do it regularly.

Even when a LiFePO4 battery is discharged to well below 50%, it will continue to provide a high enough voltage to ensure that appliances operate correctly. *When it’s been discharged by approxmately 95%, a LiFePO4 battery with a good Battery Management System (BMS) will automatically shut down. However, to maximise useful life, i’s recommended that lithium batteries are not continually discharged much below 50%.
 

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So you can discharge to 5% but not good practise to do it regularly.

Even when a LiFePO4 battery is discharged to well below 50%, it will continue to provide a high enough voltage to ensure that appliances operate correctly. *When it’s been discharged by approxmately 95%, a LiFePO4 battery with a good Battery Management System (BMS) will automatically shut down. However, to maximise useful life, i’s recommended that lithium batteries are not continually discharged much below 50%.
Yes but that article contradicts itself earlier it states:
  • Voltage remains constant for much longer during discharge.
  • Much higher charging rate and so faster charging – varies according to the charging system used.
  • Can be discharged quickly without damaging the cells, making them ideal for use with inverters.
  • Can be discharged as much as 95% on average without damaging the battery.
  • Thousands of charging cycles compared to just a few hundred from a typical lead-acid battery.
  • Very low rate of self-discharge means they can be left unattended for months.
  • Zero maintenance required.
  • Approximately 40% - 50% lighter than a good quality lead-acid battery with a similar Ah rating.
  • Very safe, with no toxic fumes or liquid and no risk of fire in normal use.
  • The ability to charge quickly from the vehicle’s engine can remove the need for a generator or fuel cell.
  • Can be used in almost every situation where a lead-acid battery is being used to power appliances in a motorhome, campervan or caravan.
If you do some research on internet the commonly held belief and advice is that they will no be damaged by discharging to 95% of capacity.
 

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I'm not happy with "Very safe with no toxic fumes or liquid and no risk of fire in normal use"

What would abnormal use be, I ask only because they do catch fire.
 

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What were the batteries that kept catching fire in the Boeing Dreamliners.?

Ray.
 

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The latest one at Heathrow was Lithium.

Ray.
 

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Please do some research, Lithium-ion batteries DO catch fire.
Lithium iron phosphate (LifePO4) batteries DO NOT.
LifePO4 is the chemistry of batteries now commonly used for motorhome use, they will of course given correct circumstances catch fire but do not cause the massive problems that Lithium-ion ones do.
Notice the different spellings Lithium-ion, Lithium iron phosphate.
 
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