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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone heard about this?

Apparently some European manufactures of motorhomes are using foam in the seats that does not conform to UK standard regarding fire.

I did notice this was brought up on sbmcc, the person there said he had heard about it on the radio, I have searched but only found info about cheap furniture arriving in Hull.

If this true about motorhome manufactures supplying us with vehicles with this foam used, I think they should be made to correct this at once.

MHS...Rob :D
 

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Yes this was on a Radio 4 early morning, I believe 0721 on 05 May, you can go on to the BBC website and listen to the broadcast.
It was not some foreign vans it was all, the jist is they are not bound by the same regulations as our manufacturers as motorhomes are classed as motor vehicles and therefore do not have to have fire reterdent upholstery, whereas our manufacturers only buy fire retardent stuff to our regs. However the cab seats are still made from the non fire retardent, poisen smoke and gas producing foam as they are made to the motor vehicle regulations.
Raises a question on buying continental and also could give some clue to why they are cheaper as fire retardent is reported to be twice the price. Frankly I'm glad I have had mine reupholstered with new foam!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Paul, I will listen to that later (have to go shopping with my wife :cry: )

Just another way of making more money again, it's not as if these vehicles are cheap is it.

Thanks again.

MHS...Rob :D
 

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Hi Rob

This article appeared in our local paper in Nottingham. The last paragraph makes interesting reading regarding the discount to cover the cost of replacement, if we all did that then something would have to change.

Regards
Phil

Upholstery in Bob Beckett’s £53,000 import motorhome fails UK standards Motor caravan was ‘death trap’
FEARS are being raised over the safety of imported motorhomes after a Bulcote man spent £53,000 on one that did not meet British fire standards. Bob Beckett, 62, plans to take his battle to Europe after he discovered the upholstery in his £53,000 luxury motor caravan did not meet the British standard. He said: “I thought it was odd there were no kitemarks on the cushions. “It was outrageous in this day and age that you pay £50,000 for a caravan and a loophole in the law makes them absolute death traps.” The saga began when Mr Beckett checked the cushions in his motorhome. He was concerned about their safety levels, but was shocked when he delved further into the rules. Any towed caravan must be fitted with furniture using only flame retardant materials under the Furniture and Furnishings Regulations 1993. The same is true of furniture in houses. But motor vehicles are excluded — and this includes motor caravans. Although UK manufacturers have fitted flame retardant cushions for years, Mr Beckett believes this is not mirrored by manufacturers across Europe. He took his case to Notts Trading Standards, who took up the issue. Manager Paul Gretton said: “Essentially we agree with him. No one knows why motorhomes were excluded from the Act in the first place.” Officers bought a motor caravan cushion from the supplier of the home Mr Beckett bought, and tests showed it did not reach British fire safety standards. So, via a council body called Lacors, officers took the evidence to the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI). But after meetings between the DTI and their European counterparts, Mr Beckett’s campaign has hit a brick wall. The DTI said there is no proof there were widespread fire safety concerns for products across Europe; but Notts Trading Standards does not have the funding or resources required to test products across the continent to establish this proof. “We cannot take it any further,” said Mr Gretton. “The DTI is the body to take this forward.” Meanwhile, the saga took another twist which was set to help Mr Beckett’s campaign. It emerged another European rule — the General Product Safety Regulations 1994 — makes it an offence to sell a product not as safe as is reasonably possible. But to prove this, a whole motorhome would need to be tested — which would cost too much. “Buying a £50,000 motorhome is beyond our resources,” said Mr Gretton. Mr Beckett has promised to campaign to get the law changed. Meanwhile, the supplier that sold him his motorhome has given him a discount to pay for replacement upholstery.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hi Glen,

Thanks for more info; I agree with you if enough people were to challenge this disgraceful disregard for our safety we may get something done.

However, that will have to be seen.

At least we are talking about it here and the more people that are made aware of this situation the more people are likely to check out their next 40/50- thousand pound motorhome.

Thanks again.

MHS...Rob :D
 
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